Category Archives: Air Crash

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Pilot and Passenger Escape Plane Crash after Engine Failure

Category : Air Crash

Pilot and Passenger Escape Plane Crash after Engine Failure

By Ofonime Essien

Plane Crash

The aircraft was significantly damaged, but the pilot and passenger were miraculously OK.

A pilot and his passenger made a lucky escape after their light plane suffered engine failure and plunged into trees in Sydney’s west.

9NEWS obtained the mayday call the pilot made before he crash-landed the plane near Moondarra Drive in West Hoxton.

He reported engine failure shortly after taking off from Bankstown Airport on a training flight.

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“We have engine failure at Bringelly near two towers. I’m trying to land aircraft in the field near two towers,” he says.

The pilot was left with little option but to glide toward the ground, where the paddock at West Hoxton became his runway.

Speaking with 9NEWS and seemingly in good spirits the pilot said he sustained “some injuries” but was “okay” overall.

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“Thank Jesus we are safe on ground. We had engine failure,” he said.

Emergency services are still at the scene.

The pilot and passenger did not receive any major injuries.

Police and firefighters remain at the scene as Civil Aviation Safety Authority investigators make their way to the crash site.

A police spokeswoman confirmed the aircraft had taken off from Bankstown Airport and was attempting to return there after experiencing engine trouble.

“The pilot was forced to make an emergency landing,” she said.

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NTSB Releases Details of Former Google Engineer Plane Crash near Eclipse Festival

NTSB Releases Details of Former Google Engineer’s Plane Crash near Eclipse Festival

By Ofonime Essien

Former Google Engineer

A small plane, flown by a Menlo Park man, crashed Aug. 19 near an Oregon airport that was a popular destination for total eclipse viewing. (Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office)

The Former Google Engineer who died last month after crashing his small plane in Oregon was planning to camp there to view the total solar eclipse, was following strict flying instructions at the small, crowded airport, according to preliminary findings from federal investigators.

Mark Rich, 58, of Menlo Park, who has worked as an engineer for Google and Airbus, died when his home-built Rich Wheeler Express CT hit the wall of a canyon on his final approach on the afternoon of Aug. 19, a mile from the Madras Municipal Airport, according to the National Transportation Safety Board preliminary report.

Plane Crashes into Tree, Pilot Survives with Minor Injuries

Rich had planned to camp at the airport and participate in Oregon Solarfest, a festival surrounding the total solar eclipse on Aug. 21 and where the sun would fully be blocked out, according to the NTSB. He submitted his airport reservation request and payment to the airport on July 22, indicating he would arrive Aug. 19 and depart after the eclipse.

The NTSB released its preliminary report on the Aug 19 crash in Oregon that killed Mark Rich.

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At the time of the crash, a Notice to Airmen, or NOTAM, was issued, instructing pilots to follow certain instructions on how to fly into the small airport due to the increased traffic.

The Statesman Journal newspaper reported that about 400 planes had been flying into that airport in advance of Monday’s total solar eclipse. A Non-Federal Contract Tower was brought in to help facilitate the increased traffic, the NTSB reported.

Each pilot was required to arrive at their assigned reservation time.

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According to the controller working the tower during the crash, Rich checked in as he was flying over Cove Palisades State Park as he was supposed to, and then his final approach was modified. Rich reported he was on a “3-mile left base to runway 34,” according to the NTSB.

“The controller cleared him to land and observed a plume of smoke shortly thereafter,” according to the report.

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Witnesses told investigators they saw the plane turn and dive “near-vertical” to the slope of a canyon about one nautical mile from the runway. The cabin and fuselage was mostly destroyed when emergency crews arrived, according to the report.

The report is preliminary and no causes of the crash have been determined.

(Mercury News)

 

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Plane Crashes into Tree, Pilot Survives with Minor Injuries

Plane Crashes into Tree, Pilot Survives with Minor Injuries

By Ofonime Essien

Tree saves Manfred Forst

© Provided by ABC News Plane crashes into tree in car park

Landing in the trees is hardly ever a first choice, but it worked out for one pilot on Monday morning. Around 11:30 a.m. local time, Manfred Forst, the pilot flying a rental Cessna 172 from Robertson Airport crashed into a tree in the parking lot of an industrial equipment company adjacent to the airport. Security camera footage of the Carling Technologies parking lot shows the 1981 Skyhawk appearing to enter a spin, when it collides with a tree. As the top of the tree snaps, the aircraft is spun around and strikes the ground mostly upright.

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The pilot, 79-year old Manfred Forst, was reportedly taken to the hospital, but released after evaluation with no significant injuries. Mr Forst, who was flying solo, escaped with only minor injuries. “I was very fortunate I got out of it without any real injuries,” Forst told his local NBC affiliate. “I’m just so thankful.”

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It is understood Manfred Forst was heading out for breakfast when his single-engine Cessna hit a tree before ending up in a car park.

At the scene, fire crews looked into a small fuel leak after the crash. Initial reports suggest a small fuel leak, possibly from a fuel sump, may have led to a loss of engine power. US aviation authorities are investigating the cause of the accident.

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The single-engine plane was registered to a flight school based at a nearby airport.

This is the eighth small plane crash of the year in Connecticut.

A total of six people died in the other crashes.

 

(Avweb)

 

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US Navy to Help Investigate Swiss Fighter Jet Crash

US Navy to Help Investigate Swiss Fighter Jet Crash

By Ofonime Essien

Swiss Fighter Jet Crash

Pilot error was deemed at fault in the October 2015 crash of an F/A-18 Swiss Air Force aircraft      (© KEYSTONE / ALEXANDRA WEY)

Switzerland has asked the United States Navy to investigate a 2015 F/A-18 fighter jet accident. US tests are being sought to explain why an engine stall warning was delayed in the crash.

The Federal Office for Defence Procurement (armasuisse) said the “in-depth investigation” will be carried out by the American Navy together with the manufacturer of the F/A-18. Armasuisse said it is not yet known when the results will be available.

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A report on the accident issued in June concluded it occurred due to pilot error. The report also indicated that the pilot, who escaped with light injuries, received a message regarding left engine failure 24 seconds late but said this delay was not directly responsible for the crash.

The accident, which took place over France’s Jura region, occurred during training with the F/A-18 and two F-5 Tiger jets. When the F/A-18 pilot wanted to fly right in the last phase of the exercise, the airplane instead began to turn to the left. The pilot tried to correct course but received a warning about the stalled engine at the same time.

The accident report stated that the pilot failed to take specific actions that would have remedied the situation and that the pilot was flying too high for safe training.

The 38-year-old pilot escaped the crash after using the ejector seat and parachuting to the ground.

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An investigation has been opened into whether the pilot violated military law by failing to comply with flight regulations. He is still employed by the air force.

Series of accidents

Switzerland’s F/A-18 jets have been involved in a series of recent accidents. An F/A-18 military jet also crashed into the mountains in central Switzerland in August 2016, while two F-5 fighter jets from the Patrouille Suisse aerobatic display team collided in the Netherlands in June. Another F/A-18 was written off after crashing near Lake Lucerne in 2013.

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In November 2016, Swiss Defence Minister Guy Parmelin announced a fighter jet strategy that involves spending half a billion francs to refurbish current planes, while laying the groundwork for purchasing new ones by 2025.

According to the defence ministry, only 25 of its 53 F-5 Tiger fighter jets are air worthy, while 30 of 34 F/A-18 planes are operational. The acquisition of new fighter planes has stalled after the Swiss people voted against the acquisition of 22 JAS-39 Gripen fighter jets in 2014.

(Swiss Info and agencies/vdv)

 

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Pilot Killed as Nigerian Air Force Air Beetle Crashes in Kaduna

Pilot Killed as Nigerian Air Force Air Beetle Crashes in Kaduna

By Ofonime Essien

Air Beetle

A Nigerian Air Force (NAF) Air Beetle Aircraft crashed in Kaduna yesterday, killing an instructor pilot  who was on board.

A statement from the NAF Headquarters and signed by its Director of Information and Public Relations, Air Commodore Olatokunbo Adesanya, said the Chief of the Air Staff, Air Marshal Sadique Abubakar, has ordered the constitution of a board of inquiry to determine the immediate and remote causes of the crash.

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The statement which did not give details of the crash and the site of the incident reads: “A Nigerian Air Force NAF Air Beetle Aircraft today (Thursday) crashed in Kaduna while on a mission.

“The only soul on board the aircraft, one of the NAF’s experienced instructor pilots, was unfortunately lost during the mishap.

“The cause of the incident is unknown but the Chief of the Air Staff (CAS) has immediately directed the constitution of a board of inquiry to determine the immediate and remote causes of the crash.

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“The unfortunate incident is a tragic reminder of the hazards associated with the flying profession. The CAS and the entire NAF family commiserate with the relatives of the late pilot instructor.”

Group Capt Adamu Gabriel Ochai

The identity of the pilot that died after a Nigerian Airforce Trainer Aircraft crashed at the permanent site of the Nigerian Defence Academy, NDA, in Kaduna has been revealed.

He is Group Capt Adamu Gabriel Ochai, a native of Adum Otukpa, Ogbadibo LGA of Benue State.

Findings reveal that he is the son of Chief David Ochai, the Clan Head ADUM/Aikwu.

(NAN)

 

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U.S. Government Accepts Responsibility for July 2015 Midair Collision

U.S. Government Accepts Responsibility for July 2015 Midair

By Ofonime Essien

Cessna 150 July 2015 Midair Collision

The U.S. government has taken responsibility for the July 2015 midair collision between a U.S. Air Force F-16 and a Cessna 150 that killed two people. NTSB

In taking responsibility for the July 2015 midair collision between a U.S. Air Force F-16 and a Cessna 150 near Charleston SC (CHS), a government report said the FAA’s air traffic controllers were responsible for actions and omissions that led to the accident. Citing the see and avoid concept, the report said the pilots of both aircraft were considered factors in the collision.

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The government’s admission came in response to a lawsuit filed by the families of the two victims aboard the Cessna who perished in the crash. The F-16 pilot ejected after the collision and was unhurt. In the report, the U.S. government added, “Accordingly, the United States does not contest its liability for their deaths [the two men aboard the Cessna] in this case, but does contest the existence, type and quantum of damages available to plaintiffs.”

The attorney for the victims, well-known aviation safety analyst and TV commentator Mary Schiavo, said the victory was, “… just the first step, a very important first step. The government finally admitted that they caused this horrible disaster.” Schiavo is expected to call for a jury trial next to seek damages from the government.

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The Cessna 150 had departed Moncks Corner Airport just before 11 a.m. local time for a VFR flight to Myrtle Beach and was flying a southeast heading, while the F-16, heading in a southerly direction, was under the control of the Charleston TRACON. The F-16 pilot was preparing for a practice instrument approach to Charleston AFB at the time of the collision. The Cessna pilot never made radio contact with CHS ATC.

The Charleston controller called the Cessna as traffic to the F-16 pilot approximately 30 seconds prior to the collision, although the fighter pilot never saw the other aircraft. An NTSB animation of radar data indicates the F-16 would most likely have passed behind the Cessna if the controller had taken no action at all.

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As the two aircraft approached closer, however, the Charleston controller turned the F-16 to a 180-heading placing the fighter on a collision course with the Cessna. At the time of the accident, the Charleston controller was working alone, but was assisted by a radar handoff controller, a typical configuration at CHS.

(Flying Mag)

 

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Loss of Engine Power Proves Fatal for Piper Pilot

Category : Air Crash

Loss of Engine Power Proves Fatal for Piper Pilot

By Ofonime Essien

Piper Pilot Crash

The pilot was departing on a cross-country flight in the twin-engine Piper PA-23-160. A witness stated that before takeoff, he spent about 20 minutes in the run-up area at the airport in Port Clinton, Ohio.

As the airplane left the runway, witnesses heard a “popping” noise come from the airplane.


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The plane struggled to gain altitude, and one witness stated it appeared to have a problem with the left engine. The airplane turned left and descended.

A review of a security camera video showed that the airplane turned left after takeoff, entered a rapid nose-down descent, and hit terrain, killing the pilot.

A small amount of water was found in the left engine’s carburetor, however firefighter response efforts could not be eliminated as a potential source for the water.

Based on the weather conditions at the time of the accident, the airplane was operating in an area associated with a risk of carburetor ice accumulation at glide and cruise power settings, but not at takeoff power settings.


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Witness reports and findings from the investigation are consistent with a loss of control following a loss of left engine power, however, the examination of the airframe and engines did not reveal evidence of any preimpact abnormalities.

The NTSB determined the probable cause as the pilot’s loss of control following a loss of left engine power for reasons that could not be determined.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA088

This December 2014 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

 

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Missed Approach Proves Fatal

Missed Approach Proves Fatal

By Ofonime Essien

Piper on Missed Approach

The private pilot was conducting a business flight in the Piper PA-34-200T. He had obtained weather briefings on the day before and the day of the flight, which indicated marginal visual flight rules conditions.

However, upon arrival in the vicinity of the airport in Port Huron, Michigan, instrument meteorological conditions prevailed, with visibility at or below the approach’s visibility minimums. However, he contacted the controller, obtained the weather information, and chose to continue the approach.

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Radar data showed that the airplane’s final approach course was unstabilized.

The last data point along the final approach course was about 0.5 mile southwest of the missed approach point, which was near the Runway 4 approach end at an altitude of 1,100 feet.

The missed approach procedure was to climb to 2,500 feet, make a climbing left turn to 4,000 feet, proceed direct to the outer marker, and hold.

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The lack of radar data points below 1,100 feet between the approach and departure ends of Runway 4 may indicate that the airplane was below 1,100 feet over the runway area, which may indicate that the pilot attempted to visually acquire the runway environment with visibilities that did not allow for adequate visual reference to land.

Likely unable to see the runway, he notified air traffic control that he was executing a missed approach.

The plane hit a wooded area about 0.39 mile north/northwest of the Runway 4 departure end. The pilot died in the crash.

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The wreckage path length and slope through the trees was consistent with a shallow angle of impact at relative high speed.

It is likely that the pilot continued flight below the minimum descent altitude without visually acquiring the runway and did not execute the missed approach procedures in a timely manner.

The filed alternate airport for the flight showed weather about the time of the accident that was above weather minimums for a precision approach that was available at the alternate airport.

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The NTSB determined the probable cause as the pilot’s decision to continue flight below the minimum descent altitude without visually acquiring the runway and his delayed and improperly executed missed approach procedure in instrument meteorological conditions.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA087

This December 2014 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

 

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Pilot Crashes After Six Unsuccessful Approaches

Pilot Crashes After Six Unsuccessful Approaches

By Ofonime Essien

Crashes

After a 90-minute instrument flight rules flight, the pilot descended toward his home airport in Seagoville, Texas, and attempted six unsuccessful instrument approaches in instrument meteorological conditions (IMC).

The controller terminated three GPS approaches and one instrument landing system approach because the pilot flew through the final approach course; one GPS approach was terminated because the pilot was performing S-turns on final.

Sunset occurred during the third approach attempt.

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After the fourth approach attempt, the controller suggested that the pilot divert to an airport with visual meteorological conditions (VMC), which the pilot declined because of the Beech V35A’s low fuel status.

During the sixth approach attempt, he stated he was “getting tired of flying this airplane.”

The controller offered him vectors to a VMC airport, but he declined, stating he wanted to “keep working until we get it.”

Soon after he made this statement, the airplane turned right toward the final approach course and rapidly descended hitting terrain. The pilot died in the crash.

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The pilot likely either attempted to descend below IMC and/or experienced spatial disorientation, but the investigation was unable to determine the precise reason for the loss of control.

The pilot’s six unsuccessful approach attempts and his decision not to divert to a VMC airport revealed poor instrument flight skills, poor fuel planning, lack of situational awareness, and poor judgment.

A review of medical records revealed that the pilot was using a sedating antihistamine and had several physiological issues, including vision deficits, diabetes, diabetic neuropathy. These conditions may have had an impairing effect on the pilot, but the medical investigation was limited by the degree of damage to the pilot’s body and the extent to which they may have affected the pilot at the time of the accident could not be determined.

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The NTSB determined the probable cause as the pilot’s loss of control and subsequent impact with terrain in instrument meteorological conditions.

NTSB Identification: CEN15FA081

This December 2014 accident report is provided by the National Transportation Safety Board. Published as an educational tool, it is intended to help pilots learn from the misfortunes of others.

 

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Swiss jet wreckage found in Alps

Swiss jet wreckage found in Alps

By Ofonime Essien

Swiss jet

An F/A-18 fighter jet. The single-seater aircraft disappeared shortly after takeoff. Photograph: Sandro Campardo/AP

The wreckage of an F/A-18 fighter jet that went missing over the Swiss Alps yesterday has been found in the mountains near the Susten Pass, army officials have said. Searches for the missing pilot were suspended overnight because of dangerous conditions.

“[The crash site] is located in a deep basin, with steep glacier slopes,” Commander Felix Stoffel of the Swiss Air Force told the media on Tuesday afternoon. “We saw a dark rock face, and debris was partly visible.”

Three army helicopters took off on Monday afternoon to help look for the missing one-seater fighter jet and pilot. Both had disappeared earlier that day flying over the mountains in central Switzerland.

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A statement by the Federal Department of Defence issued on Tuesday afternoon said the wreckage had been spotted by one of the helicopter pilots. However, it was not possible to access the crash site on foot due to poor weather conditions.

Mountain rescue specialists planned to gain access via helicopter when the weather cleared. The search for the missing pilot continued until about 8 pm on Tuesday, when army officials said bad weather, snow and avalanches posed too much of a risk to the search party. They planned to resume the search around 6 am Wednesday morning.

Officials said on Tuesday that no more details about any suspected cause of the crash would be communicated for now. Stoffel said that flying in mountainous regions is clearly more dangerous than in flat areas but that Swiss pilots are trained to manoeuvre through the Alps. He added that the takeoff and landing are the most dangerous parts of any flight, and that the crash occurred during the take-off phase from the nearby airfield at Meiringen.

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Both the aircraft and the ejector seat were equipped with transmitters.

However, no transmitter signal has been detected, and commander and former F/A-18 pilot Pierre de Goumoëns said the devices are not foolproof.

“These transmitters are fairly robust, but they have their limits,” he told the media. “Their purpose is to locate the pilot if he used his ejector seat. They are not made to survive a crash against a rock face.”

‘Hopes and prayers’

On Tuesday morning an air exclusion zone was set up between cantons Uri and Bern and 19 mountain rescue specialists were reported helping air rescue teams and Zurich police search for the missing pilot and plane. The teams are carrying out their search on foot at altitudes of over 3,000 metres (9,842 feet). The search was hampered by bad weather on Monday evening.

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The single-seat aircraft had been participating in a training mission with another jet in a thick layer of clouds. Last contact with the missing pilot was at 16:05 pm Swiss time on Monday.

“We hope and pray,” said Swiss Air Force Commander Aldo Schellenberg when asked about the pilot’s chances of survival at a media conference in Bern on Monday evening. Schellenberg said his thoughts were with the pilot and his family.

After taking off from the Meiringen military airport at 16:01 pm, the missing pilot had responded to a radio call as expected at 16:05. However, he failed to reply to a second call. He and the other F/A-18 Hornet pilot were practising manoeuvres for a potential engagement with an F-5 Tiger aircraft.

Source: Swiss Info

 

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